This episode features interviews with two Titans in the field of adoptive cell therapy: Dr Carl June from the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) and Dr Steven Rosenberg from the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Adoptive cellular therapy is where you take T lymphocytes – T cells, “the immune warriors in the body” as you’ll Dr Rosenberg describe them, out of a patient, manipulate them in some way in the laboratory, then expand them in terms of numbers and give them back to the patient.

Dr Carl June UPenn

Dr Carl June talks about one way of manipulating a T lymphocyte through the insertion of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) to create a CAR modified T cell.

Checkpoint inhibitors do not work well in cancers where there is no underlying immune response. One example of such a non-inflamed tumor is prostate cancer.

So a key question is how do we convert a non-inflamed tumor (where few T Cells present) into an inflamed one (T cells are plentiful and active)? 

In this latest episode, using prostate cancer as an example, Dr James Gulley from the National Cancer Institute (pictured below at ASCO 2015) talks about how therapeutic cancer vaccines may achieve this effect.

Dr James Gulley NCI

Giving a cancer vaccine first could make checkpoint inhibitors more effective.

Photo by © ASCO/Todd Buchanan 2015

Photo by © ASCO/Todd Buchanan 2015

Lung cancer is the No 1 cause of cancer related death in the United States.

Which is why the whole of this episode is devoted to the latest lung cancer data presented at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) that took place recently in Chicago.

In the podcast you’ll hear from Dr Jack West (pictured right) a medical oncologist at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle and Dr Ross Camidge, Director of Thoracic Oncology at the University of Colorado.

Dr West is the President/Founder of GRACE (Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education).

We’ve heard about the promise of cancer immunotherapy and in particular checkpoint inhibitors, but not everyone responds. It’s typically around 25-30% in most cancers.

So how do we identify those patients that are likely to respond, and perhaps more importantly, how can we increase the percentage of patients that do respond?

Immune biomarkers are key to answering both those questions, and understanding the rationale for where we go beyond giving just one checkpoint inhibitor, i.e. monotherapy.

In Ep 2 you’ll hear interviews conducted at the recent American Association of Immunologists (AAI) annual meeting in New Orleans.

The promise of cancer immunotherapy and in particular checkpoint inhibitors that target the PD1 PDL1 signaling pathway is the topic of this episode.

We hear about the latest data presented at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Philadelphia.

Interviews with Dr Julie Brahmer (Johns Hopkins), Dr Leisha Emens (Johns Hopkins) and Dr Ira Mellman (Genentech) take us on a journey that highlights some of the challenges and opportunities.

Dr Leisha Emens Johns Hopkins

We also hear from Dr Suzanne Topalian (Johns Hopkins), Dr Antoni Ribas (UCLA) and Dr Pasi Jänne (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute).